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Filling Canada’s Indigenous Skills Gap Would be an Economic Boom

Source: Policy Options. Max Skudra, Andrew Avgerinos, Karen E. McCallum

Summary: Gaps in Indigenous education and skills training harm Indigenous business and overall economic growth. Better data are needed to address the problem.

Turning 15 is an important milestone; it’s the age when a person becomes a potential member of the workforce. Over the course of 10 years (between 2016 and 2026), 350,000 Indigenous youth will turn 15. However, to get and keep good jobs, basic essential skills are needed. And many Indigenous youth and adults do not graduate high school, or they graduate without requisite essential literacy and numeracy skills.

There are many reasons for this, including:

  • the challenge of acquiring reliable internet in remote conditions;
  • the myriad corollary effects of growing up in households disproportionately impacted by poverty, and in households impacted by residential school syndrome.

More and more, literacy and numeracy skills are the foundation to up-skilling and meeting the demands of rapidly changing and increasingly digital workplaces. People missing these foundational skills are missing opportunities for competitive jobs. They face the threat of job disruption due to automation, being under-qualified to gain workforce entry, having skills and experience that is not transferable to the knowledge economy leaving them without the tools they need to adapt and succeed.

National Household Survey: Aboriginal Peoples

Source: Statistics Canada

Summary:Description

This topic presents data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, estimates using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal ancestry, (3) Registered or Treaty Indian status and (4) Membership in a First Nation or Indian band. Data from the 2011 National Household Survey are available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including ‘on reserve’ census subdivisions and Inuit communities of Inuit Nunangat as well as other geographic areas such as the national (Canada), provincial and territorial levels.

National Household Survey: Aboriginal Peoples

Source: Statistics Canada

Summary: Description

This topic presents data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, estimates using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal ancestry, (3) Registered or Treaty Indian status and (4) Membership in a First Nation or Indian band. Data from the 2011 National Household Survey are available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including ‘on reserve’ census subdivisions and Inuit communities of Inuit Nunangat as well as other geographic areas such as the national (Canada), provincial and territorial levels.

Success After Camp: Analyzing Economic and Social Outcomes Among Outland Youth Employment Program Participants (OYEP)

Source: Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business

Summary: About OYEP:

Outland, a division of Dexterra supplies and operates full-service remote workforce housing solutions in dozens of remote locations across the country for the natural resource industry and the Canadian Government. As part of Outland’s commitment to support Indigenous communities, the Outland Youth Employment Program (OYEP) took shape in 2000.

OYEP is a comprehensive and intensive natural resources training program aimed at Indigenous youth. As one of the largest, most sustained private Indigenous youth training and education offerings in Canada, OYEP has supported youth from over 103 Indigenous communities, with more than 590 program graduates.

Digital Economy Talent Supply: Indigenous People of Canada

Source: Cameron A., Cutean, A. (2017). Digital Economy Talent Supply: Indigenous Peoples of Canada, Information and Communications Technology Council. Ottawa, Canada.

Summary: As the technology sector continues to develop and grow, and automation increasingly permeates various components of the economy, Canada is faced with the challenge of filling roughly 219,000 ICT jobs by 2021. Doing so will necessitate a strong and reliable supply pipeline, including a local talent pool that is well-equipped with the skills to succeed in a digital economy. The first step in utilizing our local talent pool is understanding the various strengths, cultures and capacities that comprise it.

Digital Economy Talent Supply: Indigenous Peoples of Canada utilizes in-depth research and analysis to showcase first-hand the value of diversity and inclusion in Canada’s growing digital economy. Displaying opportunities, challenges and the unique needs of Canadian Indigenous communities in the move towards ICT engagement, the report shines a spotlight on one of Canada’s most significant talent streams.

Indigenous Statistics Portal

Source: Statistics Canada

Summary: The portal is part of Statistics Canada’s Indigenous Statistical Capacity Development Initiative, and provides a central location on the agency’s website where users can find links to data products about First Nations People, Métis, and Inuit.

The Indigenous Statistics Portal provides data on Indigenous communities, children and families, health and well-being, education, work, and many other topics, in one convenient location.
Users can also quickly find information on recently released products and view data from the 2016 Census.

Matters in Indigenous Education: Implementing a Vision Committed to Holism, Diversity and Engagement

Source: Toulouse, P. (2016). What Matters in Indigenous Education: Implementing a Vision Committed to Holism, Diversity and Engagement. In Measuring What Matters, People for Education. Toronto: March, 2016.

Summary: Indigenous peoples’ experiences with education in Canada has been a contentious one. The focus from the outset of imposed, colonial-based education has centred on assimilation and/or segregation of Indigenous peoples from their communities and worldviews (National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health et al., 2009).

The history of education for Indigenous peoples in Canada has structural and societal roots mired in marginalization and subjugation. Today, the improved state of education for Indigenous peoples has its foundations in the resiliency of Indigenous communities and social justice movements advocating for inclusion and change (Iseke-Barnes, 2008; People for Education, 2013).

So, what is inclusion? Who are Indigenous peoples? What are the issues that face Indigenous peoples? How can education be re-conceptualized to include Indigenous ways of knowing? And, why should we care? These are questions that will be examined throughout this paper.

First Nations People, Métis and Inuit in Canada: Diverse and Growing Populations

Source: Statistics Canada

Summary: First Nations people, Métis and Inuit make up an increasingly large share of the population.
In 2016, there were 1,673,785 Indigenous people in Canada, accounting for 4.9% of the total population. This was up from 3.8% in 2006 and 2.8% in 1996.

The First Nations, Métis and Inuit populations are growing quickly.

Since 2006, the Indigenous population grew by 42.5%, which is more than four times faster than the rest of the population.

The First Nations population— including both those who are registered or treaty Indians under the Indian Act and those who are not—grew by 39.3% from 2006 to reach 977,230 people in 2016.

The Métis population (587,545) had the largest increase of any of the groups over the 10-year span, rising 51.2% from 2006 to 2016.

The Inuit population (65,025) grew by 29.1% from 2006 to 2016.

In the next two decades, the Indigenous population is likely to exceed 2.5 million persons.

The effectiveness of web-delivered learning with Aboriginal students: Findings from a study in coastal Labrador

Source: David Philpott, Dennis Sharpe, Rose Neville, Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology

Summary: This paper outlines the findings of a study that explores perspectives of e-learning for Aboriginal students in five coastal communities in Labrador, Canada. The rural nature of many communities in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, coupled with a dramatically declining enrollment, has resulted in expanding use of e-learning as a means to provide quality high school curriculum. Recently, a Community University Research Alliance partnered with stakeholders to explore the success of e-learning in the province. Through one of the projects of this alliance, the authors examined the success of this mode of delivery for Aboriginal students from the perspective of the students themselves, as well as the perspective of parents and educators. Additionally, student performance was examined in comparison to provincial peers. A wealth of data emerged which affords insights into factors that support and hinder e-learning in coastal areas and also informs educators about the diverse learning characteristics and needs of Aboriginal students. As Canadian educators are increasingly challenged to address achievement issues that continue to characterize Aboriginal populations, this study offers important data on the viability of e-learning as a mode of curriculum delivery.

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