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Category: Classroom Practice: Secondary

Observing Snow: Toward a Culturally Responsive Curriculum

Source: Alaska Native Knowledge Network

Focus: Secondary Students

Summary: Observing Snow is intended as a journey to bridge the gap between the old and new, the traditional and the scientific, Native and Western approaches to education. A generation of sharp young minds from Native communities are encountering substantial roadblocks when faced with the typical western school curriculum. Observing Snow is an attempt to teach basic core subjects, especially science, and listening and reading comprehension, using materials that make sense to the Alaska Native student. Snow is a natural choice. Everyone who lives in the interior subarctic has a personal and intimate knowledge of snow.

Gabriel Dumont: Indigenous History

Source: Historica Canada

Focus: Senior Students

Summary: This lesson is based on viewing the Gabriel Dumont biography from The Canadians series and focuses on Dumont and the history of the Métis people. Through Dumont’s life, we can trace the culture of the Métis and identify the injustices that were inflicted upon them by an indifferent government.

Aims:

With a variety of role-playing activities and debates, students will assess the life and accomplishments of Gabriel Dumont to gain a broader understanding of Métis culture and history.

Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History

Summary: Curriculum Connections for Ontario

A Teachers’ Guide is available for each of the twelve Great Unsolved Mysteries in Canadian History, and includes background materials, activity sheets and detailed lesson plans for one or more grade-specific units for elementary or secondary students. Some suggestions are relevant for college and university classes. Just fill in our online registration form and download the guides in PDF format.

These are short, focused, age-specific, single-lesson MysteryQuests lesson plans relating to one or more of the Mysteries.

Teaching Guides: The Indian Act

Source: CBC

Focus: Secondary Students

Summary: In 1876, the young country of Canada passed a set of laws intended to govern First Nations people in Canada. Decades later, those laws still exist and are largely unchanged.

So, how and why did The Indian Act come to be? And why is it still on the books? This episode of The Secret Life of Canada explores the federal law that overhauled settler-Indigenous relations.

Possible teaching connections include Geography, History, Social Studies, Law, Civics, and Anthropology.
This teaching guide includes:

  • Lesson plan
  • Slideshow
  • Ad-free audio for download
  • Activity sheets
  • Episode transcript

Frontier School Division Social Studies 9-12

Source: Frontier School Division, Manitoba  

Focus: Grades 9-12

Summary: This page is the gateway to Grade 9-12 SS/NS resources that can be integrated into the provincial Social Studies Curriculum.  They may consist of material with an Aboriginal focus or relevant new material not yet available in existing texts. The inclusion of culturally-sensitive materials is based on the belief that affirmation of one’s culture and history can promote confidence and self-esteem, and lead ultimately to greater success in life. This is especially critical for Aboriginal students (defined here as Status and Non-Status Indians, Métis, and Inuit) within Frontier School District. Thus, one of SS/NS Department’s main roles is the creation/acquisition of materials with an Aboriginal focus. Not only can such material have a positive impact on Aboriginal students, they can also help non-Aboriginal students become aware of and sensitive to Aboriginal concerns.

Secret Path Lesson Plans

Source: The Manitoba Teachers’ Society

Focus: Elementary and Secondary

Summary: In October 2016, Gord Downie and Jeff Lemire formally launched the Secret Path, a book and CD which chronicles the story of Chanie Wenjack, a 12-year-old boy who died after running away from Residential school in the 1960s.

As part of our ongoing commitment to engage teachers in reconciliation work, the Manitoba Teachers’ Society recently assembled a group of Indigenous and non-Indigenous teachers from across the province to discuss and explore the Secret Path and to create lesson and unit plans to support the use of this resource for the teaching about Residential schools in Manitoba classrooms.

Indigenous Heroes of Reconciliation: English Language Arts – Grade 10 Albert

Source: LearnAlberta.ca

Focus: Grade 10

Summary: This sample lesson plan supports Education for Reconciliation through the inclusion of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives; role models; and contemporary contributions, with learning outcomes identified in the current Alberta programs of study for Grade 10 in English language arts, social studies, and drama.
Each sample lesson plan includes content(s) or context(s) related to one or more of the following aspects of Education for Reconciliation:

  • diverse perspectives and ways of knowing of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit, including values, traditions, kinship, language, and ways of being;
  • understandings of the spirit and intent of treaties; or
  • residential schools’ experiences and resiliency.

Links and relevant information in Guiding Voices: A Curriculum Development Tool for Inclusion of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Perspectives throughout Curriculum and Walking Together: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives in Curriculum are provided to support understandings of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit ways of knowing. Both online resources are accessed through LearnAlberta.ca.

This sample lesson plan is best supported by a cross-disciplinary approach as it will enhance learning opportunities for students to explore concepts and content.

Leaving It All Behind: Relocation of the Mashuau Innu

Source: Historica Canada

Focus – Grades 9-10

Summary: Students will be required to conduct research on the relocation of the Mushuau Innu from coastal Labrador to the settled location of Davis Inlet. Students will examine the reasons why the federal government chose this course of action. In addition, students will study the effects the forced relocation had on the Innu community.

Social Studies – Alberta

Source: Alberta Education

Focus: Grades 9-10

Summary: This sample lesson plan supports Education for Reconciliation through the inclusion of First Nations, Métis, and Inuit perspectives and experiences, with learning outcomes identified in the current Alberta programs of study for high school social studies and art.

This sample lesson plan includes content(s) or context(s) related to one or more of the following aspects of Education for Reconciliation:

  • diverse perspectives and ways of knowing of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit, including values, traditions, kinship, language, and ways of being;
  • understandings of the spirit and intent of treaties; or
  • residential schools experiences and resiliency.

Links and relevant information in Guiding Voices: A Curriculum Development Tool for Inclusion of First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives Throughout Curriculum and Walking Together: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives in Curriculum are provided to support understandings of First Nations, Métis, or Inuit ways of knowing. Both online resources are accessed through LearnAlberta.ca.

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